New Exhibit Highlights Pennsylvania State Capitol Artwork

After being closed to the public for a time during the pandemic, tours and exhibits are open again at the State Capitol in Harrisburg. Barbush, the Senate Librarian. The Senate Library currently houses the “Making a Masterpiece” exhibit. it burned down,” Barbush said. This building has been the site of historic visits, like that of President Abraham Lincoln. “Pennsylvania was such a big legislative problem in the beginning,” Barbush said. building designed by architect Joseph Huston and dedicated by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1906. “He had the grand vision that you see today,” Barbush said. This vision includes the inspired dome of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome and the inspired staircase of the Paris Opera House.” We hear people come in all the time, like, ‘I’ve lived here so long. no idea it was here. I had no idea how big it was,” Barbush said. The exhibit showcases the ornate artwork of the Capitol, from the hallways to the bedrooms.” We spotlight two of our great artists, one being Violet Oakley. She was the first woman to be commissioned for a government in the United States. She got the murals in the Senate chamber and the Supreme Court,” Barbush said. The other featured artist is Henry Mercer, who created the mosaic tiles that can be seen in the whole building. The exhibit brings to light some hidden gems. to show off some of the unknown pieces. There’s so much history here that just isn’t widely known,” Barbush said. The free exhibition runs until February 18.

After being closed to the public for a time during the pandemic, tours and exhibits are open again at the State Capitol in Harrisburg.

“You just have to get people back into the building, since we’re trying to get people back safely,” said Alexandra Barbush, the Senate Librarian.

The Senate Library currently houses the “Making a Masterpiece” exhibit.

“We have a history of the Capitol itself with the various Capitols we had here, the first in 1822 until 1897 when it burned down,” Barbush said.

This building has been the site of historic visits, such as that of President Abraham Lincoln.

“Pennsylvania was so important legislatively in the early days,” Barbush said.

Much of the exhibit focuses on the current building designed by architect Joseph Huston and dedicated by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1906.

“He had the big vision that you see today,” Barbush said.

This vision includes the dome inspired by St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome and the staircase inspired by the Paris Opera.

“We hear people come in all the time, like, ‘I’ve lived here so long. I had no idea this was here. I had no idea how big this was,'” a said Barbush.

The exhibit showcases the Capitol’s ornate artwork, from the hallways to the bedrooms.

“We are highlighting two of our great artists, one being Violet Oakley. She was the first woman to be commissioned for a government commission in the United States. She was awarded the Senate Chamber and Supreme Court,” Barbush said.

The other featured artist is Henry Mercer, who created the mosaic tiles that can be seen throughout the building.

The exhibition highlights hidden treasures.

“We really wanted to show some of the unknown pieces. There’s so much history here that just isn’t widely known,” Barbush said.

The free exhibition runs until February 18.