Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

PICTORIAL

A new report released this week by an Australian agency says the 1,400-mile Great Barrier Reef has suffered its sixth mass bleaching. Around 91% of the brightly colored marine ecosystems have been affected by this most recent disaster, which occurs when water temperatures rise. Disasters like this are becoming more frequent as the climate crisis intensifies, prompting artists like Christine and Margaret Wertheim to respond with startling exhibitions of what may be lost forever.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

The Australian-born, California-based sisters started the Crochet Coral Reef Project in 2005 to deal with the ravages of bleaching, overfishing, tourism and agricultural contamination in sprawling, labor-intensive environments. More than 40,000 oceanic works are now on display at the Frieder Burda Museum in Baden-Baden, transforming the gallery into textured ecosystems resting on pillars and protected in glass cases.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Like the organic beings they imitate, these handmade sculptures take time to make – time that is condensed into the millions of points on display; time passing for land creatures, including humans and cnidarians. Time forms a framework for the Reef Project, because as CO2 increases in our atmosphere, time becomes increasingly scarce, and what we choose to spend time on is a reflection of our values.

Part of Crochet Coral Reef’s intention is to involve local communities, and so far nearly 20,000 people have contributed their own fiber-based shapes, including around 5,000 taking part in the show alone. Baden-Baden.

Make delicate cut-out paper flowers

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Paper cutting artist Maude White continues to amaze us with her intricate illustrations cut from single sheets of paper.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Limited to only negative and positive spaces, she explores poetic compositions of lines and shapes by rendering each piece with a knife.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Wooden figures with slender and curved bodies

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Oxford-based artist Tach Pollard allows the sinuous shapes of hawthorn or oak branches to guide the forms of his fantastical figures.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

The lanky creatures stand on long limbs with hunched shoulders and curved backs, characteristics determined by the original curve of the wood.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis

Based on legends such as the Norse Eddas, the Mabinogion and the Icelandic sagas, the carvings are mysterious and minimal. Pollard tends to leave the natural color and grain of the material intact for their faces and burns the rest to achieve the deep black char. that envelops their characters.

Thousands of crochet sculptures in the face of the climate crisis